Chocolate Cloud Cake by Richard Sax (Genius Desserts)

James Ransom

James Ransom

Here is where we learn that flourless chocolate cake can mean many different things, depending on ratios and technique. Both this recipe and the preceding one from Rose Levy Beranbaum are known and loved as flourless chocolate cakes and use the same basic three ingredients (eggs, chocolate, and butter), with wildly different appearances and textures.

This one was a signature dessert of the late, beloved writer and cooking instructor Richard Sax. For the same amount of eggs as Beranbaum’s, he calls for half the chocolate and butter, and—instead of heating and whipping six whole eggs until billowy—he has you whip four of the whites with sugar to make a fluffy meringue, then gently fold them into the rest. Far from a dense and creamy torte, these three changes produce a poufy soufflé of a cake that intentionally caves in the center, leaving a craggy, wafer-like rim behind and a moussey hollow that you fill up with cold whipped cream. The effect is dramatic and bold, giving you, as Sax famously said, “intensity, then relief, in each bite.”

SERVES 8 TO 12

INGREDIENTS

CAKE

  • 8 ounces (225g) best-quality bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

  • 1⁄2 cup (110g) unsalted butter, at room temperature and cut into 1-tablespoon pieces

  • 6 large eggs

  • 1 cup (200g) sugar

  • 2 tablespoons Cognac or Grand Marnier (optional)

  • Finely grated zest of 1 orange (about 1 tablespoon; optional)

 WHIPPED CREAM

  • 1 1⁄2 cups (355g) heavy cream, very cold

  • 3 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar

  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

  • Unsweetened cocoa powder and/or bittersweet chocolate shavings, for topping

1. To make the cake, heat the oven to 350°F (175°C), with a rack in the center. Line the bottom of an 8-inch (20cm) springform pan with parchment paper. (Do not butter the pan and parchment.)

2. Melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over but not touching gently simmering water in a saucepan. You can whisk it occasionally to help it along. When it’s melted, remove the bowl from the heat and whisk in the butter until smooth.

3. In two small bowls, separate 4 of the eggs. In a large bowl, whisk 2 whole eggs and the 4 egg yolks with 1⁄2 cup (100g) of the sugar just until combined. Slowly whisk in the warm chocolate mixture. Whisk in the Cognac and the orange zest. Using a handheld mixer in a separate bowl, beat the 4 egg whites until foamy, about 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining 1⁄2 cup (100g) sugar and beat until beautifully glossy, soft peaks form that hold their shape but aren’t quite stiff, about 5 minutes more. Very gently fold about a quarter of the beaten egg whites into the chocolate mixture to lighten it, then gently fold in the remaining whites. Scrape the batter into the pan and smooth the top.

4. Set the pan on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until the top is puffed and cracked and the center is no longer wobbly, 35 to 40 minutes. Be careful not to bake the cake beyond this point.

5. Let the cake cool in the pan on a rack. The center of the cake will sink as it cools, forming a sort of crater—this is good! Let the cake cool completely on a rack. 

6. To make the whipped cream, whip the cream, confectioners’ sugar, and vanilla in a large bowl with a handheld mixer until billowy, soft—not stiff—peaks form.

7. Using a spatula, fill the sunken center of the cake with the whipped cream, swirling the cream to the edges of the crater. Dust the top lightly with cocoa powder.

8. Run the tip of a knife around the edge of the cake, carefully remove the sides of the pan, and cut into wedges to serve.

9. Store any leftovers airtight in the refrigerator—they won’t be very presentable but they’ll make a delicious moussey snack. 

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Excerpted from Food52’s Genius Desserts by Kristen Miglore (Ten Speed Press). Copyright © 2018. Photography by James Ransom

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